What you value

Hey you! Did you VOTE? It’s election Day.  Polls are open. Get there.  Vote what you value.

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(My new state of residence state seems to be under a somewhat endearing delusion that it actually resembles a heart – I think it’s closer to the anatomical heart than the Valentine’s one – but we get it…)

On the note of reflecting upon what matters to you…

A short study in Final Cut, a “how to edit” exercise using found dance footage, and seeing Silas Reiner’s and Rashaun Mitchell’s Tesseract in the same day, brought up some interesting aesthetic value questions for me.

Here’s my study, all original choreography is by Thomas Hauert Zoo Company, musical choice and video edits are mine – (totally unauthorized by them.)

I looked at several short clips of movement, and listened to the suggested tracks, but was hearing something else. Then, in that lovely uninhibited beginner fashion, just started juxtaposing things that seemed right. When a class full of students, sharing the same serious source material broke into sly smiles and laughter I loved it.  THAT! An actual connection between the audience and the work. That’s why we (I?) do this art-making thing. Prying open opportunities for connection.

On that same day, Tesseract was on at the Wexner. A Charles Atlas 3-D dance film followed by a live-feed projection enhanced dance performance choreographed by Reiner and Mitchell. I could appreciate the tension between mediated and physical bodies both in overarching structure of the evening, and within each half. Architecture as an overarching theme.  Strong physicality. Intricate patterns. Clear design choices. Beautiful lines. Interesting geometries. Strong technical dancing.  Though I wouldn’t say I enjoyed myself in the audience.

You know when you leave a show and you’re asked “Did you like it?” and your go-to response is “I don’t think it matters”?

I’d like to leave the theatre invigorated occasionally. Sometimes I like to really LIKE dance. I want to say: “ I felt something. I loved it let me buy a ticket to come back tomorrow.” (Not that most dance performances last that long).  And yet I don’t want to reduce dance/ art/theatrical experiences to escapist entertainment only.  That can be frustrating and alienating in a different way.  I’ve done that kind of work too – also not satisfying.

What is that elusive line- the right mix of virtuosities of physicality, intellect, and emotion that make a performance experience satisfying – and not just rigorous intellectual exercise -(or perhaps a combination encompassing both)?

 

They said it man…

 

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